money directing – Hot Bag Sale UK http://hotbagsaleuk.com/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:05:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-55-150x150.png money directing – Hot Bag Sale UK http://hotbagsaleuk.com/ 32 32 To compete with skyrocketing Treasury yields, banks are now offering 4% and more on “courted” 6-month to 5-year CDs https://hotbagsaleuk.com/to-compete-with-skyrocketing-treasury-yields-banks-are-now-offering-4-and-more-on-courted-6-month-to-5-year-cds/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 22:04:51 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/to-compete-with-skyrocketing-treasury-yields-banks-are-now-offering-4-and-more-on-courted-6-month-to-5-year-cds/ Holy-moly mortgage rates are approaching 7%. By Wolf Richter for WOLF STREET. Earning 4% without taking credit risk would normally seem like a lot. But these are not normal times, and the rate of inflation is more than double that rate. The Fed pulled out of the Treasury and mortgage-backed securities markets as part of […]]]>

Holy-moly mortgage rates are approaching 7%.

By Wolf Richter for WOLF STREET.

Earning 4% without taking credit risk would normally seem like a lot. But these are not normal times, and the rate of inflation is more than double that rate. The Fed pulled out of the Treasury and mortgage-backed securities markets as part of its QT, and it raised its key short-term rates to over 3%. Treasury yields are now 4% or more for maturities of one to five years.

And banks now have to compete with this and are now offering ‘courted’ CDs at rates above 4% on maturities of six months to five years. For yield investors and savers, if they take advantage of these rates, their money is wiped out by inflation at half the rate it would be wiped out in their regular bank account. But if you have to borrow money, for example to buy a house, it now becomes much more expensive.

Treasury securities: maturities of 1 year to 5 years at more than 4%.

The 6-month Treasury yield today is up slightly to 3.9% so far, the highest since November 2007, from nearly 0% less than a year ago:

The 1-year Treasury yield has risen to 4.14% at present, the highest since November 2007, from nearly 0% less than a year ago:

The 2-year Treasury yield is now at 4.21%, the highest since September 2007, and up from 0.25% a year ago.

The two-year yield began to rise around this time last year, as it began to price in the Fed “pivot”. By the end of 2021, it had fallen to 0.73, while the key Fed rates were still close to 0%. But the Fed had already started to “reduce” its asset purchases and was talking about rate hikes in the future.

The 5-year Treasury yield pushed up to 4.0% at the moment, barely there:

Banks now compete for deposits with Treasury securities:

Buying Treasury securities is now easy. People can buy them through their broker in the secondary market or sometimes at auction. And people who open an account on Treasurydirect.gov can buy them directly at government auctions.

And the yields offered by Treasuries with maturities of up to five years are what banks must compete with if they want to attract new liquidity.

Banks have noticed that their customers are moving money from their bank accounts into treasury securities and treasury money market funds, because they’re getting almost 0% in the bank, and they’re getting about 2% in a fund Treasury money market and 4.14% on one-year Treasury securities.

Banks therefore begin to compete for deposits. And they do it with “brokered” CDs, which are FDIC-insured CDs that banks don’t offer to their existing customers (they still get close to 0%), but do offer new customers through brokerage accounts. where these CDs can be purchased like stocks.

Banks offer these CDs through brokers, not to their own customers, because they don’t want to pay all their existing customers 4% interest on their deposits, but they only want to pay 4% on the fresh money they attract, while they continue to pay their loyal customers at almost 0%.

For banks, traded CDs are a form of “speculative money” that comes and goes, unlike regular bank deposits, which tend to be stickier.

So I checked with my broker today. And that’s what they offer in terms of traded CDs. Here are the highest bank interest rates I’ve seen since 2008:

  • CD 6 months: 4.04%
  • CD 9 months: 4.12%
  • CD 1 year: 4.05%
  • CD 2 years: 4.20%
  • CD 5 years: 4.30%

Some CDs are ‘redeemable’ and may offer a higher rate but with the risk of being ‘redeemed’ if interest rates fall. It is good to check so that there are no surprises.

Holy-moly mortgage rates are approaching 7%.

The average 30-year fixed mortgage rate climbed to 6.70% today, according to a daily measurement from Mortgage News Daily. This is the most immediate measure we have of the mortgage market.

Freddie Mac’s weekly measure, released Thursday, and based on mortgage rates earlier in the week, jumped to 6.29%, the highest since November 2008.

But Freddie Mac’s weekly average was based on mortgage rates in effect before Wednesday afternoon – before the Fed announced a 75 basis point rate hike and projections for further rate hikes of 125 basis points. this year, which could bring its short-term policy to around 4.4% by the end of 2022.

For people who took out mortgages in the 1980s and early 1990s, something like 6.7% might still seem pretty low, or incredibly low, given that inflation is over 8% , but house prices are now in the ionosphere, inflated by years of the Fed’s interest rate crackdown and QE, including the Fed’s purchases of mortgage-backed securities. And financing a house at those ionospheric prices today at 6.7% is an entirely different matter than financing a house in the 1990s at that kind of interest rate.

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Coming to Manti was one of the best decisions they ever made https://hotbagsaleuk.com/coming-to-manti-was-one-of-the-best-decisions-they-ever-made/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 06:13:35 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/coming-to-manti-was-one-of-the-best-decisions-they-ever-made/ After 26 years, Astes sold the family dental practice Manti MANTI—In the mid-1990s, Dr. Leonard Aste worked as a dentist for the United States Public Health Service. For seven years in the Public Health Service, he had been assigned to various federal penitentiaries. Ellen and Leonard Aste in their living room in Manti. Behind them, […]]]>

After 26 years, Astes sold the family dental practice Manti

MANTI—In the mid-1990s, Dr. Leonard Aste worked as a dentist for the United States Public Health Service. For seven years in the Public Health Service, he had been assigned to various federal penitentiaries.

Ellen and Leonard Aste in their living room in Manti. Behind them, photos of their four children. Left to right, Whitney, pediatric dentist in Salt Lake City; Griffin, who works for an Internet marketing startup in St. George; Brady, who works in marketing for a company in Provo; and Connor, who went back to college to earn a teaching certificate in hopes of coaching high school football.

At their home in Oregon, “I made sure all the windows…were locked before our kids fell asleep,” says his wife, Ellen. “There had been kidnappings and all kinds of crazy stuff.”

The Astes, who had both grown up in Davis County, wanted to move back to Utah. “We drew a circle,” Leonard said. “We wanted to be within five hours, but preferably within a few hours” of Salt Lake. They were “really lucky,” he says, to find a dental practice for sale in Manti.

A few months ago, after 26 years, the Astes sold the practice to Dr. Richard Carlile, who previously practiced in Port Angeles, Washington. Leonard’s last day in the office was late August.

Reflecting on his years as a family dentist for residents of Manti and Sanpete County, Leonard says, “That’s all I wanted it to be. When I got into dentistry, I wanted to have a practice where I knew my patients like friends, and that’s exactly what I think I did.

His years as owner of Manti Family Dental all come down to people, he says. “We have some of the most amazing people you could ever want to meet… It’s been an absolutely wonderful and rewarding experience to have them as friends and to have their support.”

Ellen, who served two terms on the South Sanpete School Board and is now an Elementary Arts Specialist in the North Sanpete School District, says the main lesson she has learned from the past 26 years is, “Don’t don’t be afraid to try new things. Going into private practice, there were so many unknowns, but we just unpacked the bags (and) dove headfirst into them. If you’re willing to do the work, you get the dividends.

After Leonard’s time in the public health department and by the time they moved to Manti, they had four children. “Our youngest was only a few months old.” Ellen said. At that time, she focused on raising children.

The two Astes had spent their lives up to then in the cities. Moving to Manti was a revelation. “I remember going to Manti Grocery and not really believing it was my grocery store,” Ellen says.

The only place they could find to rent was at 300 North, across from Temple Hill. “The following year, I was totally surprised at the influx of people for the (Mormon Miracle) Pageant. The sound just blew up in that little house. The crowds and the parking lot. It was just crazy.

The solution: participate. “I did the competition with my children from then on, I jumped in with both feet,” she says.

While building his practice in Manti, Leonard became deeply involved in what has become a huge effort to provide dental services to the poorest people in the Dominican Republic (located in the Caribbean Sea on the same island where Haiti).

“I grew up in a very, very poor home,” he said. “A lot of people helped us. My desire to help others was kind of instilled very early on.

A fellow dentist invited him to travel to the Dominican Republic after a hurricane. His friend brought a dental student. “When we went there, we just saw this incredible need,” he says. And he and his friend observed “what an incredible experience” the trip was for the student.

Within a few years, Leonard took it upon himself to create a nonprofit foundation and obtain a 501(c)(3) designation from the IRS, which allowed the foundation to accept tax-deductible contributions. ‘tax. The foundation started raising funds, buying equipment and making two trips a year.

“It spread like wildfire,” he says. “We started to welcome students from all over the country, and even from abroad.”

The foundation recruits students from the University College Dental School and a private dental school in Salt Lake County. But he has also developed relationships with dental schools in Scotland and Spain. Schools require students to undertake a humanitarian trip abroad.

“We have a collaboration with the dental hygiene program at Dixie State (now Utah Tech). We have about eight hygiene students,” explains Leonard.

The foundation has also developed a partnership with the Physician Assistant Program at Idaho State University in Pocatello and typically takes eight Physician Assistant students and some ISU faculty on each trip.

Dr. Leonard Aste de Manti played a key role in assembling this group of dentists, dental students, other healthcare professionals and volunteers, for a humanitarian trip to the Dominican Republic in 2019. A foundation organized by Aste and others has taken 3,000 volunteers on at least 40 trips to the Dominican Republic over the past 25 years.

Over the past 25 years, Leonard has played a key role in organizing at least 40 trips involving 3,000 healthcare professionals and other volunteers.

“We decided to make our group a mobile group,” he says. “We can practice anywhere, whether it’s under a banana tree or in a tent. We provide services to people in very remote villages.

Many people from Sanpete County, including the Aste children, have participated in these trips. The Manti LDS Stake Humanitarian Center sent “hundreds and hundreds” of baby kits and T-shirt dresses for young children.

As Leonard was building her humanitarian foundation, Ellen decided she wanted to “be involved in education in a meaningful way.”

She applied to the South Sanpete School Board and started going door to door. In her first race, she lost. But in her second race, she won by eight votes. She was re-elected for a second term by 10 votes.

Reflecting on her conditions on the school board, she says, “I already knew that, but the education people are there for all the right reasons. Almost everyone does it because they believe they can make a difference, because their efforts on behalf of students and children will impact those lives.

While Ellen was on the school board, despite South Sanpete being one of the poorest districts in the state, the district was able to give every high school student iPads, hire quality teachers, and most importantly again, make significant capital investments.

Ephraim and Gunnison have new elementary schools. Additions were built on Manti Elementary and Manti High School. And a new kindergarten was built near Manti Primary School.

“Nobody does this alone,” she says, “but you get a team of like-minded people together, and the things you can accomplish — that’s pretty good.”

The Astes’ own children benefited from the schools in southern Sanpete, especially in the field of sports.

“The kids had so many wonderful opportunities, so many great coaches, so many friends,” Ellen says. “Here, our children could play three sports a year, and they could excel in all three. It was an incredible opportunity that we could give them.

All of the Aste children are graduates of Utah Valley University. His daughter Whitney, a former Miss Manti, went to dental school at Creighton University in Omaha, Neb., the same school Leonard attended, and is now a pediatric dentist in Salt Lake City.

Griffin, a son, played football at Snow before graduating from UVU and now works for an internet marketing startup in St. George. Brady does marketing for a company in Provo.

Connor, the youngest, decided to go back to school to study education with the goal of becoming a high school football coach. He is currently helping the Manti football team.

Ellen says that after her school board service ended and her kids grew up, “it was really an adjustment to find a new place to fit in.” She had a degree from the U. of U. in Education. But at the end of her forties, she decided to return to university to obtain her master’s degree.

She went to Western Governors University, an online university known for assigning large volumes of written work. “It was incredibly difficult,” she said.

“She’s been great,” Leonard says. “She won awards for her master’s thesis…I was very proud of her.”

After a year working for a grant-funded program to steer underprivileged children into kindergarten and another year teaching at Snow, she accepted the position of art specialist at North Sanpete. Each week, she visits four of the five elementary schools in the district and teaches all classes in the schools.

The Astes had thought of selling Manti Family Dental within the next two years. Then, out of the blue, Leonard received a call from Dr. Carlile. Like the Astes decades earlier, the Carliles wanted to return to Utah to raise their family. Richard Carlile’s wife, Rose Fife Carlile, had grown up in Manti.

“We met and I sort of vetted him to see if he had the experience to take care of my patients,” Leonard says. “…He has been away for about 10 years and has a post-graduate education…I feel good with him and his family. They are going to be a real asset to the community, him and his wife.

Leonard points out that he is not retiring, just moving on to other aspects of dentistry. He now teaches at the University College Dental School two to three days a week.

He works for insurance companies reviewing problematic claims and advising companies on the suitability of services. He travels the country as an examiner for the clinical portion of the dental licensing exam. This involves observing students who are about to graduate to determine if they are ready to practice.

He is treasurer of the Utah Dental Association and in a few years is expected to become president of the association.

Many dentists focus on money or recreation, he says. “Then there are some of us who want to make sure the profession retains its credibility… They’re just a great group of people, and I love working with them.”

The Astes say one thing is certain. Coming to Manti was one of the best decisions of their lives. “We could have made a lot more money if we had stayed on the Wasatch front,” Leonard said. “But the quality of life and the environment in which we wanted to raise our children – it was worth it.”

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President Biden signs executive order directing Cfius to focus on specific national security risks – terrorism, homeland security and defense https://hotbagsaleuk.com/president-biden-signs-executive-order-directing-cfius-to-focus-on-specific-national-security-risks-terrorism-homeland-security-and-defense/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 15:13:08 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/president-biden-signs-executive-order-directing-cfius-to-focus-on-specific-national-security-risks-terrorism-homeland-security-and-defense/ September 20, 2022 McDermott Will & Emery To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com. On September 15, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden signed an Executive Order (EO) to strengthen federal review of foreign investments in U.S. businesses deemed essential to U.S. national security […]]]>

To print this article, all you need to do is be registered or log in to Mondaq.com.

On September 15, 2022, U.S. President Joe Biden signed an Executive Order (EO) to strengthen federal review of foreign investments in U.S. businesses deemed essential to U.S. national security interests.1 For the first time since the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) began reviewing foreign acquisitions of U.S. companies in 1988, under its authority to review and block such transactions if they threaten to harm National Security of the United States, the President provided guidance on a number of risk areas that CFIUS should consider when reviewing transactions within its jurisdiction (covered transactions).2

IN DEPTH

Specifically, recognizing that some countries use foreign investment to gain access to sensitive data and technology for purposes detrimental to U.S. national security, EO directs CFIUS to consider impact of transactions covered on the following:

  • Critical U.S. Supply Chains May Have National Security Implications: The EO directs the CFIUS to examine the effect of a covered transaction on the resilience and security of the supply chain, both inside and outside the defense industrial base. In its assessment, CFIUS must consider the degree of diversification through alternative suppliers throughout the supply chain, supply relationships with the U.S. government, and concentration of ownership or control by the foreign person in each supply chain.

  • U.S. Technologies in Areas Affecting National Security: EO specifically identifies sectors that are fundamental to American technology leadership and therefore national security, including (but not limited to) microelectronics, artificial intelligence, biotechnology and biomanufacturing, quantum computing , advanced clean energy, climate adaptation technologies and agriculture industry elements. basis that have implications for food security. The OE asks the CFIUS to consider whether a covered transaction involves manufacturing capabilities, services, critical mineral resources or technologies in these areas.

  • Overall Investment Trends: The EO directs the CFIUS to review prior investments by foreign persons in a single industry or related technologies.

  • Cybersecurity risks that threaten to harm national security: This directive demonstrates the Biden administration’s concern for future malicious activity on the Internet. OE directs CFIUS to consider whether a covered transaction may provide outside persons, or their connections to relevant third parties, access to systems or technology that would allow them to conduct malicious cyber intrusions or other malicious cyber activities.

  • Sensitive personal data of US citizens: EO directs CFIUS to review whether a covered transaction involves a US company with access to sensitive data of US persons and whether the foreign investor or its related parties sought or could exploit such information.

EO relies on existing statutory and regulatory factors3 ; it highlights some acute concerns in the current environment, but it does not change CFIUS’ current jurisdiction or how it conducts its investigations.4 However, it can be expected that the five areas highlighted by the OE will be subject to even greater scrutiny as part of the CFIUS review process. Accordingly, parties to transactions involving any of these five areas should take them into account in their analysis of whether to notify a transaction to CFIUS and how they might respond to any concerns that CFIUS might raise in the process. part of the review process.

Footnotes

1. Executive Order on Ensuring Rigorous Review of Evolving National Security Risks by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, (September 15, 2022) available on
https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2022/09/15/executive-order-on-ensuring-robust-consideration-of-evolving-national-security-risks-by-the- committee-on-foreign-investment-in-the-united-states/.

2. The Committee on Foreign Investments (CFIUS) was created by executive order in 1975. In 1988, however, Congress passed the Exon-Florio Amendment, which authorized CFIUS to block foreign investments if they threatened national security .
See BACKGROUNDER: President Biden signs executive order to ensure thorough reviews of evolving national security risks by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States(September 15, 2022) available on https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2022/09/15/fact-sheet-president-biden-signs-executive-order-to-ensure-robust-reviews-of-evolving- national-security-risks-by-the-committee-on-foreign-investments-in-the-united-states/;
see also 50 USC App 2170.

3. See in general 50 United States Code § 4565(f); 31 CFR Parts 800 and 802.

4. Call for the Press in President Biden’s Executive Order on Inbound Foreign Investment Screening(September 15, 2022) available on https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/press-briefings/2022/09/15/background-press-call-on-president-bidens-executive-order-on-screening-inbound-foreign-investments.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide on the subject. Specialist advice should be sought regarding your particular situation.

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FIA ordered crackdown on Hundi operators https://hotbagsaleuk.com/fia-ordered-crackdown-on-hundi-operators/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 10:20:43 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/fia-ordered-crackdown-on-hundi-operators/ In an effort to control the continued devaluation of the Pakistani rupee against the dollar, the government has ordered the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) to carry out an “immediate crackdown” against illegal money changers and hawala and hundi operators. According to the details, the Chief of Staff of the Director General (DG) of the FIA […]]]>

In an effort to control the continued devaluation of the Pakistani rupee against the dollar, the government has ordered the Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) to carry out an “immediate crackdown” against illegal money changers and hawala and hundi operators.

According to the details, the Chief of Staff of the Director General (DG) of the FIA ​​issued a notification to all area offices, ordering to launch a crackdown on illegal money changers and hawala and hundi operators.

The notification stated that the continued devaluation of the Pakistani rupee was having a negative impact on the economy. A weekly report of the crackdown will be sent to the Director of the Economic Crime Wing (ECW) of the FIA.

“In the meantime, Area Directors will keep an eye out to prevent possible corruption under cover of operations,” the notification reads.

The decision to take action to stop the smuggling of US dollars was taken at a meeting chaired by Finance Minister Miftah Ismail.

It is pertinent to mention here that the Pakistani rupee weakened by 8.66 paisa against the United States (US) dollar in the interbank foreign exchange market over the past week.

According to a weekly report, the greenback closed at Rs236.84 against the national currency, down from Rs228.18 at the start of the business week.

In the open market, the US Dollar appreciated by Rs 6.50 to close at Rs 241 from Rs 234.50 at the start of the business week.

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Legendary directors who didn’t go to film school https://hotbagsaleuk.com/legendary-directors-who-didnt-go-to-film-school/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 21:51:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/legendary-directors-who-didnt-go-to-film-school/ Lilly and Lana Wachowski, known collectively as the Wachowskis, are two of the most prominent directors working in Hollywood today. They marked the industry in 1999 with the release of “The matrix,” which the sisters wrote and directed. “The Matrix” was a groundbreaking film and stands as one of the most iconic films of the […]]]>

Lilly and Lana Wachowski, known collectively as the Wachowskis, are two of the most prominent directors working in Hollywood today. They marked the industry in 1999 with the release of “The matrix,” which the sisters wrote and directed. “The Matrix” was a groundbreaking film and stands as one of the most iconic films of the 1990s, as it influenced a plethora of later films, both creatively and technically.

The Wachowskis took a circuitous, non-traditional path to Hollywood stardom, having started out in comics. Instead of going to film school, Lana attended Bard College, while Lilly went to Emerson, but both women dropped out before graduating. (Lilly, at least, took a film class in school.) They did some construction work, and in 1993 they used their collective creativity to write for Imprint of Marvel Comics, Razorline’s Barkerverse (by Wired). They continued to work in comics and wrote “The Matrix” for that medium before taking the story to the big screen.

Before that happened, they went to Warner Bros., having written the script for an action thriller, “Assassins” (by News Feed). The movie got a front-page rewrite and failed to generate much profit, forcing the Wachowskis to realize that if they wanted their visions to come to life properly, they had to do it themselves. They made their first movie, “Bound,” for a few million dollars, and it became a critical success. It was sort of a test of their directing abilities, which producer Joel Silver gave before greenlighting the movie the Wachowskis were dying to make. Their third film for Warner Bros. was “The Matrix,” and that film catapulted the duo to impressive heights, all without a college degree.

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Texts: Ex-Mississippi governor knew about Favre welfare money https://hotbagsaleuk.com/texts-ex-mississippi-governor-knew-about-favre-welfare-money/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 22:41:26 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/texts-ex-mississippi-governor-knew-about-favre-welfare-money/ JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Newly leaked text messages show how deeply involved a Mississippi governor was in paying Brett Favre more than $1 million in welfare to help pay for one of the quarterback’s pet projects. -retired NFL fullback. Instead of the money going to help low-income families in one of the country’s poorest states, […]]]>

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) – Newly leaked text messages show how deeply involved a Mississippi governor was in paying Brett Favre more than $1 million in welfare to help pay for one of the quarterback’s pet projects. -retired NFL fullback.

Instead of the money going to help low-income families in one of the country’s poorest states, as planned, it was channeled through a non-profit group and was spent on a new $5 million volleyball facility at a university that the football star and the governor both attended.

One of the 2017 texts showed Republican Gov. Phil Bryant, who left office in 2020, “agreed” with the arrangement. The state is suing Favre and others, alleging they spent millions on welfare. The nonprofit’s director pleaded guilty to criminal charges in Mississippi’s biggest public corruption case in decades.

The texts were in court documents filed Monday in state court by an attorney for the nonprofit known as the Mississippi Community Education Center. Messages between Favre and the center’s executive director, Nancy New, included references to Bryant. The documents also included messages between Bryant and Favre and Bryant and New.

“I just left Brett Farve,” Bryant emailed New on July 16, 2019, misspelling the athlete’s last name. “Can we help him with his project. We should meet soon to see how I can make sure we keep your plans on track. »

New replied, “I would appreciate the opportunity to follow all the good things we are working on, especially projects like Brett’s.”

Later that day, New texted Favre to let her know she was meeting with the governor.

“I love John so much. And so do you,” Favre replied to New, referring to then-Mississippi Department of Social Services director John Davis.

The texts also showed a discussion between Favre and New about arranging for the Department of Social Services to be paid through the nonprofit to Favre for speaking engagements, with Favre saying he would direct the money to the University of Southern Mississippi Volleyball Center.

Favre played football at the University of Hattiesburg before going to the NFL in 1991, and his daughter started playing on the volleyball team there in 2017.

According to court documents, Favre texted New on Aug. 3, 2017, “If you were to pay me, would the media anyway find out where it’s from and how much?”

New replied, “No, we never had that information made public. I understand, though, that you’re uncomfortable about it. Let’s see what happens on Monday with the conversation with some people from Southern. Maybe be that it will click with them. Hopefully.”

Favre replied, “Okay thank you.”

The next day, New texted Favre, “Wow, I just hung up on Phil Bryant! He’s on board with us! We’re gonna do it!”

Favre replied, “Great, I needed to hear that for sure.”

According to a previous court filing, New’s nonprofit made two welfare payments to Favre Enterprises, the athlete’s business: $500,000 in December 2017 and $600,000 in June 2018.

On December 27, 2017, Favre texted New: “Nancy Santa came over today and dropped off some money (two smiley face emojis) thank god thank you.”

“Yeah, he did,” New replied. “He thought you had been pretty good this year!” »

Lawyers for Favre did not immediately respond to a telephone message Wednesday from The Associated Press.

In a July 11 court filing, New’s attorney wrote that Bryant ordered him to pay $1.1 million in welfare to Favre through the education center for “speaking at ‘events, keynote speeches, radio and promotional events and business partner development’.

In July, a spokesperson for Bryant said allegations that the governor had spent the money improperly were false and that Bryant had asked the state auditor to investigate possible aid fraud. social.

Bryant served two terms as governor and was unable to run again in 2019 due to term limits. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern Mississippi.

New and his son, Zachary New, who helped run the nonprofit, pleaded guilty in April on charges of misappropriating welfare money. They are awaiting sentencing and have agreed to testify against others.

Favre has not been charged with any criminal act.

In May, the Mississippi Department of Social Services filed a civil lawsuit against Favre, three former professional wrestlers, and several other individuals and companies in an attempt to recover millions of ill-spent welfare dollars. The lawsuit said the defendants had “wasted” more than $20 million from the anti-poverty program of temporary assistance to needy families.

About 1,800 Mississippi households received payments from the program in 2021, according to the Department of Human Services. A family of three must have a monthly income of less than $680 to qualify, and the current monthly benefit for this family is $260. Payments are allowed for up to five years.

In pleading guilty, Nancy and Zachary New admitted spending $4 million in welfare on the volleyball facility.

The mother and son also admitted to donating welfare funds to Prevacus Inc., a Florida-based company trying to develop a concussion drug. Favre has stated in interviews that he supports Prevacus.

Mississippi auditor Shad White said Favre was paid for speeches but did not show up. Favre repaid the money, but White said in October he still owed $228,000 in interest.

In a Facebook post when he repaid the first $500,000, Favre said he didn’t know the money came from social funds. He also said his charity has provided millions of dollars to poor children in Mississippi and Wisconsin.

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Pierre Poilievre denounces Justin Trudeau’s “radical awakening coalition” https://hotbagsaleuk.com/pierre-poilievre-denounces-justin-trudeaus-radical-awakening-coalition/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 22:05:46 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/pierre-poilievre-denounces-justin-trudeaus-radical-awakening-coalition/ ST. ANDREWS BY-THE-SEA, NB – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre offered competing visions for the country on Monday in dueling caucus speeches that laid battle lines bare for the return of Parliament next week. The ideological divide will pit the Trudeau Liberals, who champion the role of central government in […]]]>

ST. ANDREWS BY-THE-SEA, NB – Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and new Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre offered competing visions for the country on Monday in dueling caucus speeches that laid battle lines bare for the return of Parliament next week.

The ideological divide will pit the Trudeau Liberals, who champion the role of central government in program spending and job creation, against the Poilievre Conservatives’ call for less state involvement in the lives of empowered individuals. .

“Our job as government is to build an economy where everyone is ready to thrive in a net zero world, an economy where everyone has real opportunities for meaningful work, an economy where people can rely on their neighbors, on their communities and – yes – on their governments, to support them in difficult times,” Trudeau said Monday during his party’s New Brunswick caucus retreat.

“Now is not the time for politicians to exploit fears and pit people against each other.”

It was a blunt blow to Poilievre, who the Prime Minister went on to accuse of pursuing “highly questionable” and “reckless” economic policies. Trudeau cited the new Conservative leader’s support for cryptocurrencies, hinted at his promise to fire the Bank of Canada governor over soaring inflation, and accused him of ‘fighting’ vaccinations COVID-19 “that have saved millions of lives”.

“What Canadians need is responsible leadership,” said Trudeau, who stood at a podium with dozens of Liberal MPs lined up behind him on a road outside a resort. on the coast of New Brunswick.

Last week, the Star reported that Trudeau had told his cabinet in Vancouver that he would lead the Liberals against the new Conservative leader and until the next election.

“In stormy times, now and in the future, we will continue to be there for Canadians with the investments and supports that build a better present and a better future,” he said Monday.

Earlier in Ottawa, Poilievre addressed the Conservative caucus for the first time as a leader since his decisive leadership victory on Saturday night.

New Conservative leader Pierre Poilievre met with his party’s national caucus on Monday after winning a landslide victory in the leadership race. He says he wants the Conservatives to give Canadians hope. (SEPTEMBER 12 / THE CANADIAN PRESS)

In his speech, he lambasted the Liberal government for allegedly reckless spending and its “woke radical coalition” with New Democrats in the minority parliament. He called on the Liberals to freeze all ‘tax increases on workers and seniors’ after citing planned increases to federal pensions and EI premiums, and pledged to halt all growth future overall government spending if his party wins power.

“I want every Canadian to have the opportunity that I had,” Poilievre said. “Coming from humble beginnings, but working hard every day, making sacrifices, being responsible, and making all those virtues pay off as they pursue their dreams in their country – a country with a small government and great citizens, where the state is the servant and the people are the master.

He also backtracked on the rhetoric of his leadership campaign, arguing that government regulations and “access control” are holding back economic growth.

“We know that every dollar spent by government is paid for by the working class taxpayer and senior citizens of this country, whether through inflation, debt or taxes,” Poilievre said.

“We know that when excessive regulation and oversight hold back our economy, it means hold back the ambitious dreams of hard workers.”

Poilievre’s resounding victory in the Tory leadership race – he won with 68% support on the first ballot – came days before the Liberals on Tuesday unveiled a host of measures they say will help Canadians struggling with the rising cost of living. Trudeau had planned to announce them last week, until the death of Queen Elizabeth II triggered a long period of official mourning across Canada.

The Star reported at the time that the package was tied to the confidence and supply agreement with the NDP, in which the Liberals pledged to adopt a series of progressive policies in exchange for New Democrats maintaining their minority government until June 2025. The measures include money for dental care for children under 12 without existing insurance coverage, an increase in federal housing benefits and a doubling of GST refunds paid to low-income Canadians.

In his Monday speech, Poilievre took credit for the fact that there was even a package on the table, citing the alarm bells he’s been ringing about inflation for years.

“They finally had a revelation that Canadians are paying too much,” he said, “and in fact Canadians are out of money and this prime minister is out of touch.”

His meeting with Tory MPs on Monday came as the House of Commons was set to return from its summer break and Poilievre was due to organize and implement a plan for the work of the official opposition this fall.

MPs will meet later this week to pay their respects to the Queen, but the real work of Parliament resumes next Tuesday.

He took a personal moment on Monday, inviting his wife Ana and son Cruz to the caucus room stage to celebrate Cruz’s first birthday with cake.

Poilievre said his goal — and that of his party — is to work toward a Canada that gives everyone the same opportunities they had growing up.

“We know people are hurting across this country,” he said, “and the way we turn that pain into hope is to fight for people to have the chance to realize their dreams.”

Meanwhile, in their caucus meeting, Liberal MPs hit back, saying Poilievre was speaking empty words without real solutions to the complex economic problems facing Canada.

Housing Minister Ahmed Hussen, who earmarks billions of dollars to subsidize affordable housing and federal coffer rents, criticized Poilievre for using political rhetoric based on “gimmicks.”

Responding to Poilievre’s pledges on spending restraint, Hussen said Liberals and Conservatives have a “fundamental difference of opinion” about how government can help people.

“When you invest in child care, for example, you might think of it as a government expense, but it actually frees people up so they can get back into the workforce,” Hussen said.

“I see these things as much-needed investments that pay off many, many times over.”

Mark Holland, the Leader of the Government in Parliament, also dismissed Poilievre for offering “simplistic” solutions.

“Pretending you can snap your fingers and make things go away – of course, throughout history these things have had appeal. But the reality is that dealing with what we have in front of us is going to require seriousness, honesty and challenges,” Holland said.

“We have to be upfront and direct with people with this.”

Others acknowledged that Poilievre might have the potential to compete with the Liberals for government.

Nathaniel Erksine-Smith, Toronto Liberal Caucus Chair and MP for Beaches—East York, called Poilievre a “capable” politician who could pose a threat if he drops his leadership campaign talking points on the Economic Forum. world and cryptocurrencies.

“We need to approach this fall with a focus on economic recovery and tackling inflation, the cost of living, job creation, health care and labor shortages there. “, Erskine-Smith said.

“If he comes after us on these issues, I think we will have a really substantial debate. But if it’s about, you know, suing us for being woken up by climate change, then that’s going to be very silly and I think we’ll continue to be the ruling party.

Within the Conservative Party itself, MPs and others were discouraged by some of Poilievre’s leadership campaign rhetoric during the race, but on Monday all were ready and willing to rally behind their new leader.

“We have differences of opinion from time to time,” said Ed Fast, a BC MP who backed Jean Charest for leadership. Fast was kicked out of his role as the party’s finance critic in May after telling reporters he was “deeply disturbed” by a promise to fire the governor of the Bank of Canada if Poilievre became prime minister.

“We will have arguments, we will resolve them as a family and we will pursue the case of hopefully replacing the failed government of Justin Trudeau.”

With files by Raisa Patel

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Q&A: Tyler Perry on directing his first screenplay, 27 years later https://hotbagsaleuk.com/qa-tyler-perry-on-directing-his-first-screenplay-27-years-later/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 04:32:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/qa-tyler-perry-on-directing-his-first-screenplay-27-years-later/ TORONTO — Tyler Perry has directed his first screenplay, 27 years after writing it. “The Blues of a Jazzman” which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, was Perry’s first attempt at screenwriting long before Madea made him a media mogul, back when he was pouring the little money he had in less successful stage […]]]>

TORONTO — Tyler Perry has directed his first screenplay, 27 years after writing it.

“The Blues of a Jazzman” which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, was Perry’s first attempt at screenwriting long before Madea made him a media mogul, back when he was pouring the little money he had in less successful stage shows in Atlanta.

After directing numerous films, dozens of television episodes and expanding its 330 acres Tyler Perry Studios empire in Atlanta, Perry returned to that old script, barely changing a word, for his first Netflix movie. (“A Jazzman’s Blues” begins airing September 23.)

“The timing seemed right,” Perry said in an interview ahead of the film’s premiere on Sunday.

Set in mid-century Georgia, the film stars Joshua Boon as Bayou, a sensational juke joint who, before setting off to make it big in Chicago, falls in love with Leanne (Solea Pfieffer). Years later, she returns to their hometown married and passing for white. It’s a romance sketched against the backdrop of Southern segregation and the booming music scene of the time, with songs by Terence Blanchard and choreography by Debbie Allen.

Notes have been edited for brevity.

AP: What was going on in your life when you wrote this?

PERRY: I was really struggling and poor. It was a really tough time. I had the chance to see a play by August Wilson. If I’m not mistaken, I think it was “Seven Guitars”. I had to sneak an intermission and walk in when people were coming out to smoke. I couldn’t afford a ticket. There was an after party at a little cafe and I bumped into him. I told him what kind of shows I was doing and how there was so much more I wanted to do. He encouraged me not to be ashamed of what I was doing but also to do whatever I wanted. I went home and started writing and ‘Jazzman’ came along.

AP: Where does the story come from?

PERRY: I grew up in New Orleans and have family in rural Louisiana. This is where I spent the summers with my grandmother. So I knew this world very well. When I was a young boy working on Bourbon Street, I heard all kinds of music. While I was writing, all this music was in my head. I wasn’t trying to write a period piece about someone passing through the South. A few years ago, I remember seeing a photo of my grandmother and my great-grandmother who looked like white women. My grandmother married my grandfather, who was clearly black. According to my aunt—I’m checking this now—there are people in my family who pose as white people.

AP: Was it something your family talked about?

PERRY: No. It’s the weirdest thing about generations before me. I find this true with my Jewish friends who have grandparents who survived the Holocaust. We just don’t talk about it. We don’t talk about it. I think this is a horrible disservice to future children and to the people who profit from the atrocities endured by our families. If you don’t know the facts of what happened and how it happened, I think you are doing your family a disservice.

AP: This may be your most ambitious film to date. Did you feel that you had to prepare for it?

PERRY: One hundred percent. “Diary of a Madwoman”, my first film, I didn’t direct because I didn’t know how. It took all those movies and all those TV episodes to really understand cinema. I really credit David Fincher and (Ben) Affleck when I was on “Gone Girl” where I really started to understand and understand. For me, it’s always been that the camera was just there to tell the story. I didn’t grasp the fullness of all the things the camera can represent.

AP: So why tackle it now?

PERRY: I was strategic. I had to make sure I was super serving my niche, my audience. I needed those achievements to be able to get it here. It’s all part of the plan. The reason this has come to light now is because I have watched so many politicians and powers that be trying to downplay and whitewash the black experience in America. I think it’s up to us as storytellers to bring these true stories to the fore because of this assault on history.

AP: Georgia has been at the center of some of the battles over voting rights, abortion rights and the school curriculum. How do you feel about having your studio there?

PERRY: I have two views on this. The first is: to be on the very ground and at the home of Dr. Martin Luther King and see their struggle, see the vigor it took to get things done. There is a richness on which I flourish, to which I connect, which I appreciate. On the other side, we deal with all this gerrymandering, voting rights issues, abortion issues. All of these moments happen but I have to focus on the fighters to be able to function in a state that I like.

AP: Some in Hollywood have already called for a boycott of productions in Georgia. Last year, Will Smith’s film ‘Emancipation’ has pulled out of filming in the state. What do you think of these kinds of measures?

PERRY: Some of them, I think, are extreme. We have this cancel culture now that if someone does something you don’t like or says something you don’t like, they get cancelled. If the state makes a law you don’t like, you don’t go. The reason I take issue with all of this is that every four years there is an election, or every two years with the midterm elections. We have the opportunity to try to change it. So I think drastic and immediate shutdowns can be harmful to the people who work here. Right now I have over $400 million in the ground at Tyler Perry Studios. And there are a lot of people who come to work there who would never have had the chance to be in this profession. I know Hollywood is really very diverse now. Well, you don’t get more diverse than Tyler Perry Studios. If you try to boycott the state, you boycott these people too.

AP: You had a content deal with Viacom for years. This is your first movie with Netflix. Looking for a bigger platform?

PERRY: I built this machine and it’s ready to produce tons and tons and tons of content. So I want to be in a place where that content can be created and a place where I can express things like “Jazzman” or whatever I want to do next. I have a zombie movie I’ve been working on for a while that I want to do. I just want to be in a place where I can cultivate all of these things.

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Motient’s Richard Watson talks about helping rural hospitals stay afloat https://hotbagsaleuk.com/motients-richard-watson-talks-about-helping-rural-hospitals-stay-afloat/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 07:38:55 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/motients-richard-watson-talks-about-helping-rural-hospitals-stay-afloat/ More than 130 rural hospitals have closed since 2010. Watson, the co-founder of health tech company Motient, spoke with the Chief Health Officer about supporting rural hospitals. Rural hospitals have been fighting for their survival for years, and Richard Watson says the situation is becoming even more troubling. A physician, Watson spent years in rural […]]]>

More than 130 rural hospitals have closed since 2010. Watson, the co-founder of health tech company Motient, spoke with the Chief Health Officer about supporting rural hospitals.

Rural hospitals have been fighting for their survival for years, and Richard Watson says the situation is becoming even more troubling.

A physician, Watson spent years in rural emergency medicine in Kansas and Alaska. He is also co-founder of Motient, a health technology company that works with hospitals and health systems on patient transfers.

“We are looking at an untenable situation from a rural perspective,” Watson said. health director in a recent interview.

Since 2010, 138 rural hospitals have closed, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Analysts say hundreds more hospitals are at legitimate risk of bankruptcy.

Watson spoke with health director on the rural hospital landscape and the need to reorganize the financing of rural hospitals. He also explained how his company works with rural hospitals to get more information about their patients.

In many hospitals, more than half of the patients they treat are covered by Medicare or Medicaid. These reimbursements are not enough to support rural hospitals, he said.

“Health care has to make decisions because we’re at a fragile point,” Watson said. “It’s very fragile at the moment. Hospitals are aware that they are at the limit.”

Despite their funding problems in rural hospitals, “we still have a number of people we need to take care of.”

President Biden’s administration has proposed a new mechanism to help rural hospitals. CMS plans to create a new provider designation called “Rural Emergency Hospitals”. It will enable small rural hospitals to provide access to emergency and outpatient services, CMS said. Watson said he supported the idea.

“I think there’s a lot of good thinking that went into that,” Watson said.

Congressional lawmakers are also pushing for a bill to extend the duration of two key programs providing about $600 million a year to rural hospitals.

U.S. Representatives Carol Miller, a Democrat from West Virginia, and Terri Sewell, a Democrat from Alabama, sponsored the Rural Community Hospital Assistance Act (ARCH). The invoice Extend health insurance programs designed to help small rural hospitals for another five years. Funding for these programs expires at the end of September. A similar bill in the Senate would extend the programs permanently.

Ultimately, funding for rural hospitals needs to be revamped, Watson.

“If they were to recognize a critical level of health care that needs to be present, and we supplement based on that, that changes the sentiment of rural hospitals,” Watson said.

Watson’s company, Motient, has been heavily involved in helping rural hospitals meet the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Motient has partnered with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment to track transfers between hospitals. Kansas hospitals, as well as state prisons, use Motient’s “Mission Control” platform to organize data. The platform also allows hospitals to gain valuable data on the patient transport process.

Thanks to the platform, hospitals did not have to spend time on the phone to find available beds. They were able to use Motient’s to find available hospitals and arrange transportation.

“We can take on the burden of fixing the transportation system while we do the logistics work,” Watson said.

Ashley Goss, assistant secretary of the Kansas Department of Health, said in a statement last December, “Motient’s assistance has been invaluable during the pandemic, and its 24/7 communications team, has helped our communities overcome the hospital capacity crisis.

Motient also provides rural hospitals with valuable data that could help them provide better patient care, Watson said.

“Motient’s job is to help them understand that you’re moving 20 to 30 people to the emergency department,” Watson said. “They have a chance to capture some of that.”

Patients who are not critically ill could be candidates for treatment in their hometown, rather than transferred to a facility far from family and loved ones, Watson said.

Using data from Motient, hospitals can learn more about the patients who pass through their hospitals and develop new services. For example, if a hospital sees an increase in the number of patients with diabetes, the organization might consider developing a telehealth or remote patient monitoring program to help patients manage the disease.

This could avoid costly hospital stays for patient and provider

“Not only is it more profitable, but it gives sustainability to these local facilities,” Watson said. “Know what comes in and goes out of your hospitals. Use data to monetize your system.

To date, approximately 140 facilities are using Motient’s Mission Control solution. Most of Motient’s partners are in Kansas, but the company also works with facilities in Nebraska, Missouri and Louisiana.

Rural hospitals need all the help they can get.

More than 500 rural hospitals are at immediate risk of closure due to economic hardship, Center for Healthcare Quality and Payment Reform reported. An additional 300 rural hospitals face a high risk of closure because they have low financial reserves or are highly dependent on government funding and revenue sources beyond patient volume.

Watson, who has spent most of his clinical career serving patients in towns with fewer than 15,000 people, said the government should provide more incentives for doctors to practice in rural areas.

The Biden administration is leading $52 million from the US bailout train rural health care providers. Watson said spending more money on training young doctors, with an obligation to work in rural hospitals for a period of time, would improve health care in rural areas.

“It creates a flow of new talent into rural areas,” Watson said. Although many of these providers only practice in rural areas for a few years, Watson said, “it gives these communities a vibrant health scene.”

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Lucy Smith – A Heart for Lifelong Service https://hotbagsaleuk.com/lucy-smith-a-heart-for-lifelong-service/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 07:00:58 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/lucy-smith-a-heart-for-lifelong-service/ It is impossible to categorize Lucy Smith’s work and volunteer experiences into just one area – she has spent her entire life committed to humanity. From saying yes to countless local community projects, teaching English as a second language, being a midwife, or driving an ambulance in Africa, she has volunteered in countless ways here […]]]>


It is impossible to categorize Lucy Smith’s work and volunteer experiences into just one area – she has spent her entire life committed to humanity.

From saying yes to countless local community projects, teaching English as a second language, being a midwife, or driving an ambulance in Africa, she has volunteered in countless ways here at home. and in various cultures around the world.

The daughter of a Navy surgeon, Smith was born on Marine Corps Base Camp LeJeune in North Carolina. Due to her father’s military career, by the time she was in high school, her family had moved eight times, setting the stage for her ability to adapt to new environments.

She graduated with high honors in 1975 from Indiana University with a degree in pre-law, but was unsure whether to continue her studies in law and so enrolled in a multitude of law courses. studies in fields ranging from business to adult education.

A teacher told her she had enough credits to sink a battleship.

Having been a volunteer tutor in high school and college, Smith saw education as a marketable career. So she got her elementary school certificate and in 1975 started working in a day treatment center for preschool and kindergarten children.

But his heart was resolved to go abroad.

“I was young. I wanted to see the world,” Smith said.

She was able to get a cheap ticket to Tokyo, Japan, and while there she visited an international primary school.

“I went into the kindergarten class and the teacher was a little frantic because she had to give a presentation at the PTA that afternoon,” she said. Knowing that Smith had a background in elementary and preschool education, the teacher asked him for help.

“I said, ‘Of course!’ I did a lot of games and songs. I was new to the kids and we had a blast,” Smith said.

At the end of her visit, the principal offered her a job – the kindergarten teacher was leaving the following year – and then gave her 24 hours to make a decision.

“I haven’t slept all night, and I wondered why I wouldn’t do this?” she says.

She returned to Tokyo a month later and found a Japanese dormitory for international business professionals, with a second floor housing maids and babysitters; Smith also became a nanny.

“I lived with 26 Japanese women between the ages of 18 and 72, and these women were so welcoming to me,” she said. “It became my wonderful immersion in Japanese language and culture.”

Smith stayed there for a year, also teaching English as a second language, before moving to Colorado (her family’s favorite ski vacation destination) and finding work in export marketing, working both in the marketing and legal departments, which corresponded to his training.

IN BLOCKSmith met and married a Montana native, and the couple moved to the Flathead Valley in 1989.

“The Flathead was a small community then,” Smith said. “So finding work was a bit more difficult.”

Smith turned to the library to see how to become a volunteer tutor, discovered the organization Literacy Volunteers of America, and trained as a tutor. The Flathead County affiliate director was leaving, so Smith partnered with Jana Goodman to co-direct the local nonprofit for a few years. Smith continued as director for 12 more years, helping to greatly expand its services and reach.

At 50, still interested in volunteer work abroad, in 2003 she took a three-plus-year position with Lalmba, a non-profit humanitarian aid organization for which she was a long-time donor, working in Eritrea, Ethiopia and Kenya to lead and manage programs providing education for children and the elderly, medical care and other basic needs.

“I went from the small, desperately poor desert country of Eritrea to the high altitude tropical jungles of Ethiopia,” she said. In Kenya, she trained a local team in the modern management of their offices.

“They’ve done a lot of things by hand very well, but these clinics are seeing over 100 patients a day,” she said. “People were doing a terrific job.”

Smith says her years in East Africa were rich because she learned so much about different cultures and languages.

“Every day reminded me of how extremely privileged I am in my Western life,” she said. And the ease of living that I take for granted.

When she returned to Kalispell in 2006, she resumed her duties on the board of trustees of the Hockaday Museum of Art, eventually becoming the museum’s director until 2011, a job she greatly enjoyed.

In 2012, she took another big step by saying yes when asked if she would become the first director of the Flathead Community Foundation.

Through all of Smith’s different paths with nonprofits, she says it was natural for her to be able to spread the word about the importance of supporting community foundations.

“The work has deepened my respect for our nonprofit community and our community of donors and supporters,” she said.

Smith retired in 2017 from the Flathead Community Foundation (which merged into the Whitefish Community Foundation in 2020) so she could devote more time to caring for her aging parents in Colorado. Both of her parents died last year within weeks of each other.

SMITH’S OTHER Stewardship roles in the Flathead community are very extensive. She has been a Rotarian since the 1990s, her father having been a Rotarian for 65 years. She is the area governor and district liaison to the state organization, and has worked on international Rotary projects in Guatemala and Mexico.

“What I love about Rotary is that it’s about service,” she said. “He brings leaders together and takes responsibility for making the world a better place.”

Smith also sits on the board of the Whitefish Community Foundation and is a member of the local non-profit charity Women Who Wine.

A longtime member and former board member of the Glacier Symphony and Chorale, she became involved with Flathead Valley Community College’s One Campaign to raise funds to build the College Center’s new McClaren Hall, the new hall Glacier Symphony show. She has also sung with the Crown of the Continent Choir and the Kalispell Compline Choir, and this summer attended one of Bobby McFerrin’s week-long Circle Singing Workshops, along with over 100 other attendees.

Since 2015, Smith has participated in the Pan Mass Challenge in Massachusetts, a race that attracts nearly 6,000 cyclists and raises funds for the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Every August she rides a double century – 200 miles in two days – from Sturbridge to Provincetown to the tip of Cape Cod, riding with the husband and daughter of a dear friend being treated for liver cancer there- low, as well as in honor of his cousin who was treated for lymphoma.

“You know you raise a lot of money for research, patient care and especially pediatric oncology. It matters to so many people,” she said. “And that’s important to you because you’re also affected by other people’s lives.

“That’s why I keep getting involved with all these different community projects,” Smith said. “It’s nice to be at the age where I’m the helper – sort of a general community volunteer rather than a leader – having seen and experienced the struggles and challenges that people face around the world and how they survive and thrive by helping each other. You see that everywhere. People have a way of lifting each other up…even in dark circumstances.

“Here, we have people who have needs. People struggling,” she said. “Our community is rich with opportunities and dilemmas. When we come together, we make the most of our skills and resources. That’s what I appreciate the most. I find it exciting to notice the strengths, intelligence and great judgment of all the different people here.

“My college advisor once joked that my biggest problem would be choosing my path among the many different things that interested me,” Smith said. “She was right, but I think I solved the dilemma by picking more than one!” …always choosing.

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