Strategic planning – Hot Bag Sale UK http://hotbagsaleuk.com/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 04:04:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-55-150x150.png Strategic planning – Hot Bag Sale UK http://hotbagsaleuk.com/ 32 32 The School of Arts and Sciences moves forward with flagship initiatives https://hotbagsaleuk.com/the-school-of-arts-and-sciences-moves-forward-with-flagship-initiatives/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 03:28:08 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/the-school-of-arts-and-sciences-moves-forward-with-flagship-initiatives/ The School of Arts and Sciences continues to make progress in planning and implementing what it has judged”flagship initiatives » as part of their update strategic plan– a decade-long program to “build a leading university”. The initiatives’ webpage says they will “build on existing strengths to create exciting and transformative new ventures,” although most actions […]]]>

The School of Arts and Sciences continues to make progress in planning and implementing what it has judged”flagship initiatives » as part of their update strategic plan– a decade-long program to “build a leading university”.

The initiatives’ webpage says they will “build on existing strengths to create exciting and transformative new ventures,” although most actions are still in the planning stage. The school hosted a “first look” fair for community members to learn more about the initiatives on Wednesday, September 14.

Arts & Sciences announced the initiatives last spring, along with several other strategic plan changes. At the time, Provost Beverly Wendland said the University would begin implementing the outlined changes in the fall 2022 semester and would continue to do so for the next decade.

The eight initiatives were created to strengthen the arts and science strategic plan, each linked to one or more of the six strategic pillars: Transdisciplinary Futures Incubator, Transdisciplinary Institute in Applied Data Science (TRIADS), Research Fellowship Program Public Studies, Literary Arts Center, Living Earth Collaborative 2.0, Center for Quantum Leaps, Global Health Undergraduate Program, and Literacies for Life and Career.

Associate Dean of Research Deanna Barch served as co-chair of strategic planning for Signature Initiatives alongside Abram Van Engen, the Dean’s Fellow for Educational Innovations.

According to Barch, creating the initiatives was a team effort of faculty and arts and science administrators.

“We had a great team of people involved,” Barch said. “Creating the plan was truly a community-wide effort. There have been many town halls, surveys, outreach and meetings to generate ideas for elevating the arts and sciences. »

Strategic initiatives cover a wide range of disciplines and interests. Many initiatives focus on advancing research at the University, such as the Transdisciplinary Futures Incubator.

“[The Incubator for Transdisciplinary Futures] is a framework for people to write funding proposals to try out new transdisciplinary research and teaching programs,” Barch said.

The Transdisciplinary Institute in Applied Data Science (TRIADS) initiative also supports research across fields of study to address social issues.

“[TRIADS] is not a project in itself, but rather a channel to help faculty gather around new research projects focused on applied data science,” Barch said. “Data science can be used to answer big questions about government, economics, sociology, and other topics.”

The Center for Quantum Leaps initiative focuses on quantum technology and how it can be applied to uses in biomedical and life sciences, from nuclear power to drug testing.

Other initiatives focus on public service and community collaboration.

The Public Scholarship Program initiative aims to translate the work of the University to the general public by collaborating with local organizations, creating jobs and internships, and teaching innovative courses.

The Living Earth Collaborative 2.0 initiative also aims for the University to partner with local groups involved in biological and environmental issues.

“The Living Earth Collaborative is all about conversation and education about sustainability and green ideas,” Barch said.

The undergraduate program initiative in public health will establish a major in global health, focusing on how environmental and racial factors play out health outcomes and patterns seen across the world.

The eight flagship initiatives facilitate interdisciplinary learning. The Literacies for Life and Career initiative, for example, promises to integrate information applicable to relevant jobs and life experiences into courses across all departments.

Erin McGlothlin, co-director of Literacies for Life and Career, said the initiative will have a wide impact.

“[Literacies for Life and Career] will touch every arts and science course, student, advisor and faculty member,” said McGlothlin.

Selected faculty members will meet throughout the fall 2022 semester to work on the rationale for the initiative and determine the specific literacies that will be presented.

“We have hired 10 arts and science faculty members to be literacy fellows who will define literacies,” McGlothlin said. “They have already met and started their work.”

After defining the literacies, early adopters will test the effectiveness of the initiative through existing courses. Eventually, literacies will be implemented in all first-year courses and beyond.

“At the end of the 5-year period, [Literacies for Life and Career] will be considered in all arts and science courses,” said McGlothlin.

While each initiative has its own committee and timeline, all are subject to a three-year planning and testing schedule. Many have not reached the testing stage.

“We hope for all [of the initiatives] to start this year,” Barch said. “However, we have to see if they work and if they achieve what we hope they will. We believe that three years is a good evaluation period.

New initiatives are also underway, but the University has yet to announce any.

Lauren Bruhl, a junior and major in environmental analysis, has not yet heard of the Living Earth Collaborative 2.0, but sees it as an interesting initiative for the University to take.

Bruhl said the Living Earth Collaborative 2.0 could allow more students studying environmental analysis or majors in similar fields to engage with the material in a unique way.

“I would definitely be interested in learning more about this [the Living Earth Collaborative 2.0] and I think that would be a great move for WashU,” Bruhl said.

As the year progresses, students can expect to hear updates on the progress of the Signature Initiatives.

“It’s a particularly exciting time to be at WashU,” Barch said. “I’m really looking forward to seeing how things play out over the next few years.”

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USM Creates First State Center to Combat and Study Human Trafficking | Free News https://hotbagsaleuk.com/usm-creates-first-state-center-to-combat-and-study-human-trafficking-free-news/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 19:38:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/usm-creates-first-state-center-to-combat-and-study-human-trafficking-free-news/ Earlier this summer, the Mississippi Colleges Board of Trustees approved a proposal from the University of Southern Mississippi School of Social Work to establish a human trafficking research and training center. of Human Beings – the first center of its kind in the state. The purpose of CHRT is to chart a new course for […]]]>

Earlier this summer, the Mississippi Colleges Board of Trustees approved a proposal from the University of Southern Mississippi School of Social Work to establish a human trafficking research and training center. of Human Beings – the first center of its kind in the state.

The purpose of CHRT is to chart a new course for Mississippi anti-human trafficking policies, legislation, protocols, and victim services.

Human trafficking is the exploitation of other human beings, young and adult, of all genders, for sexual and/or labor purposes. Hundreds of cases are reported each year in Mississippi, according to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, but due to reporting limitations, USM researchers believe the numbers are likely even higher than current data suggests.

“There is a general lack of knowledge regarding the scope and complexity of human trafficking in Mississippi, and we believe this can be significantly improved,” said Dr. Tamara Hurst, CHRT co-director and associate professor. at the USM School of Social. Work. “We are encouraged that the DIH Board of Directors has given a vote of confidence to our CHRT proposal, as well as the support of our University President, Provost, Dean and Director of ‘school. We know there is a lot of work ahead of us and we can’t wait to get started.

The CHRT will be an interdisciplinary collaboration of researchers, trafficking survivors, and students who will participate in the collection, analysis, and evaluation of human trafficking data from state and local agencies in Mississippi. . By working to develop a screening and assessment tool for statewide use, the CHRT team will help streamline data collection and management to prevent the spread of misinformation and inaccurate data. Their findings will inform evidence-based education and training for agency personnel in an effort to accelerate the development of Mississippi’s anti-human trafficking efforts.

A recent series of training and adult learning on human trafficking through the Mississippi Department of Social Services Division of Youth Services found that youth services counselors had little understanding of definitions of human trafficking, risk factors and sources of referral for children who had been victims of human trafficking. The co-directors of CHRT seek to change that and much more using their professional and academic expertise.

Groundwork to combat human trafficking in Mississippi began in 2015 with Governor Phil Bryant’s Human Trafficking Task Force, to which Hurst was appointed. In 2019, the Mississippi Human Trafficking Council, housed within the Department of Public Safety and in partnership with the Mississippi Department of Health, was funded by the federal government to engage law enforcement in multidisciplinary efforts to anti-trafficking across the state.

An active participant in these conversations and efforts, Hurst was appointed by the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Mississippi to chair a strategic planning and trafficking protocol subcommittee for the Council.

While working with various organizations in Mississippi, Hurst realized that an effective solution to the state’s human trafficking problem had to be firmly grounded in subject matter expertise and research to to succeed. She envisioned an academic center that could meet those needs and connect experts from across the country to learn what works and what doesn’t.

Leading this new approach from an academic perspective would be quite an undertaking, which is why Dr. Kimberly Hogan was a welcome addition to the state in 2021. Dr. Hogan joined the faculty of the USM School of Social Work with new ideas and a vast network of connections.

Hogan is an expert consultant for the United States Department of Justice. Her research focuses on the prevention, detection, identification and treatment of sex trafficking among minors and adults.

To learn more about the Human Trafficking Research and Training Center, visit usm.edu/chrt. For more information about USM School of Social Work, visit usm.edu/social-work.

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Greenbrier Valley benefits from tourism while working towards a sense of normalcy | State and region https://hotbagsaleuk.com/greenbrier-valley-benefits-from-tourism-while-working-towards-a-sense-of-normalcy-state-and-region/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/greenbrier-valley-benefits-from-tourism-while-working-towards-a-sense-of-normalcy-state-and-region/ As tourism quickly becomes the centerpiece of West Virginia’s economy, Greenbrier County is taking a more strategic look at its biggest industry. In its 2021/2022 annual report, the Greenbrier County Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) outlines the steps they have taken and the progress that has been made in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, […]]]>

As tourism quickly becomes the centerpiece of West Virginia’s economy, Greenbrier County is taking a more strategic look at its biggest industry.

In its 2021/2022 annual report, the Greenbrier County Convention and Visitors Bureau (CVB) outlines the steps they have taken and the progress that has been made in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic, as well as future plans for improve “tourism-related sectors” of the department.

“The annual report provides a 30,000 foot snapshot of what we’ve done as an organization over the past year,” CVB President and CEO Kara Dense told the Register-Herald. .

The report also contains a complete illustration of the efforts, statistics and results of the marketing strategies described in the 2020/2021 annual report.

“While Covid is far from over,” Dense wrote in the report’s introductory statement, “we have continued to work towards a sense of normalcy with fewer restrictions and larger gatherings and events returning to our region. .

“At the start of 2022, the CVB Board of Directors decided it was time to assess our organization and the county’s tourism industry,” Dense continued.

The first step in the evaluation process was commission from Young Strategies, Inc., a North Carolina-based research and planning agency specializing in the travel and destination industry.

“We engaged Berkeley Young, president of Young Strategies, to help us develop a strategic plan,” Dense wrote. “We will continue to focus on workforce development and transportation issues and continue to be advocates for the industry.”

Young surveyed some 400 “Greenbrier County leaders and tourism industry stakeholders” seeking input related to a variety of issues. Once the data was collected, Young partnered with Destination International – a developer of destination marketing software – to identify both the strengths and weaknesses of CVB’s current business plan. In May of this year, Young met with the CVB board to develop a three-year strategy based on his findings.

“Our goal was to have many Greenbrier County leaders and travel industry partners directly involved in the investigation and strategic planning process,” Young said. “Success is achieved when leaders and partners are engaged to develop the resulting plan.”

As part of the new ‘Destination Management Plan’, the CVB has created the position of ‘Destination Development Manager’. According to Dense, the office hopes the position will be filled by the fall.

To further configure its campaigns, the CVB is working with Epsilon – a results-driven marketing company – to identify the people most likely to travel to the Greenbrier Valley. CVB’s current marketing campaign targets potential travelers located in the Washington DC, Charleston/Huntington, Columbus, Lynchburg/Roanoke and Pittsburgh markets.

According to Epsilon reports, Greenbrier County had a total of 2,700 visitors for the period April 2021 through August 2021. Hotels and lodging accounted for 63% of visitor spending, while fuel purchases and groceries each accounted for 6%. Restaurants, retail stores, outdoor recreation and entertainment combined account for the remaining 25% of all visitor spending.

In another successful effort, the Greenbrier County CVB, Summers County CVB, New River Gorge CVB, Visit Southern West Virginia, and the West Virginia Department of Tourism have come together as the Regional Destination Partnership. The purpose of the partnership was “to promote the New River and Greenbrier Valley as a regional destination.” Each partner received six pages in the West Virginia Travel Guide, 50,000 copies of which were distributed with The Washington Post on May 22 of this year.

“With the designation of New River Gorge National Park and Preserve as our nation’s 63rd national park and the marketing and public relations efforts of the WV Department of Tourism, West Virginia has garnered national and global media attention. “, Dense said in the report. “Our state has been featured on USA Today, Frommer’s, Conde Nast Traveler and Time Magazine to name a few.

“Our region has certainly benefited from the attention,” Dense added. It’s a belief shared by West Virginia Tourism Secretary Chelsea Ruby.

While speaking on a panel at the West Virginia Press Convention in Charleston in early August, Ruby said, “I would say there is nothing that has more one-sided support in the state of West Virginia right now as tourism. Every legislator, every county commissioner, every mayor, every city council – it seems like every one of them is excited about tourism and trying to figure out what they can do to be a part of it.

With the combination of 17 positive mentions of Greenbrier County in articles published in international travel magazines, along with the efforts of the Regional Destination Partnership, CVB’s marketing efforts are estimated to have reached more than 543 million people worldwide. world. This created $5 million in advertising value, a 20% increase over the prior year.

“Thank you for your continued support of Greenbrier County’s tourism industry,” Dense concluded. “We look forward to a successful year ahead.”

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New Richmond City Council OK Design Services for New Library | Local News https://hotbagsaleuk.com/new-richmond-city-council-ok-design-services-for-new-library-local-news/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 15:15:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/new-richmond-city-council-ok-design-services-for-new-library-local-news/ After several months of silence on the library project, the New Richmond City Council voted unanimously to approve a design services contract for the new library worth $60,000 with ISG at its meeting Monday September 12. “This phase of the project will take approximately six to eight weeks. ISG representatives will meet with library staff […]]]>

After several months of silence on the library project, the New Richmond City Council voted unanimously to approve a design services contract for the new library worth $60,000 with ISG at its meeting Monday September 12.

“This phase of the project will take approximately six to eight weeks. ISG representatives will meet with library staff and library board members and there will be additional public engagement,” said City Administrator Noah Wiedenfled. “I hope this process will give the public a better idea of ​​what the new library would look like, how it would work, as well as a better idea of ​​the cost,”

The process to date has consisted of meetings with ISG partner 360 Real Estate Solutions and several public engagement opportunities. This is the city’s first major financial investment in the project.

According to the city’s Sept. 13 press release, the schematic design phase of the project will provide “more developed floor plans, conceptual reflected ceiling plans, interior and exterior renderings, preliminary interior finish and framing, stories for HVAC/plumbing/electrical/technology systems and cost estimates.”

So far, cost estimates have been approximate. With more accurate floor plans, these estimates should become more accurate.

“One of the things we want to do once we have these cost estimates is … tell the story of the real impact on the average ratepayer of a $200,000 or $300,000 home. It will also help explain the importance of having this private partner and other uses versus just building a standalone library,” Wiedenfeld said.

Much of the summer was spent meeting with Ehlers, the city’s financial advisor, to develop a financial strategy to pay for both initial construction as well as long-term lifecycle costs, including the maintenance, personnel, insurance and utilities.

“We realize that we will not be able to raise millions of dollars for a project. I would say the city council is supporting borrowing to help move the project forward,” Wiedenfeld said.

So far, housing has been the main shared use that has been focused on in the planning stages.

“When you look at meeting other needs in the community, we know housing is a big issue. We know it is possible to help downtown, help meet housing needs and make the project more financially viable,” Wiedenfeld said.

Wiedenfeld recently toured six ISG properties in the La Crosse area along with Mayor Jim Zajkowski, Library Director Monica LaVold and Alderman Mike Montello.

LaVold hoped to answer an important question in his mind as well as in the minds of many residents, how to operate a library next to an apartment building.

“My reflection was more operational, what do we do for the library? How to manage a library on the same site as the residences? LaVold said.

A problem for LaViold was how open Wi-Fi access would work between library patrons and apartment dwellers.

“On the fly, they came up with three or four different options… What impressed me was the foresight this team put into things like resource sharing,” LaVold said. “I feel we can do it with this team.”

Further public engagement is planned. Ideas include using Election Day and parent-teacher conferences and the book fair, especially at the elementary school level, to solicit feedback directly from residents.

Community members are encouraged to provide feedback through the City’s Strategic Planning online survey to: New Richmond Strategic Plan.

Residents can also view the construction project page on the library’s website at, newrichmondlibrary.org/buildingin the coming weeks for additional updates, information and opportunities to participate.

“In addition to the construction project itself, although we have been talking about a new library for many years, it is important to continue to highlight what our library does, the value it has for our community, what is being said about our community and the important role a library can play in the social fabric of New Richmond in the future,” said Wiedenfeld.

Once this phase of the project is complete, construction plans would be approximately 30% complete and renderings could be shared with the public.

Board members also approved the rezoning of the new library site at 421 S. Green St. from Z5 to Z6 to give planners more flexibility.

Council members refused to comply with a resident’s request to detect metals on city pathways and in city parks and to dig up objects if detected.

The current ordinance allows scouting on city property but not digging without special permission.

Administrator Wiedenfeld argued that digging without knowing what else might be buried in a particular location could unintentionally damage infrastructure.

“It would be easy to touch something, whether it was an irrigation system or underground utilities. In some cases, we may think something is a park when it is actually private property. Often, if a call comes in or it’s a complaint about someone digging in a park, it will likely depend on our police department. to determine whether or not that person had permission to dig or not. Our preference would be to keep the order as it is,” Wiedenfeld said.

Baker Tily partner Kim Shult presented council members with highlights from their audit of the city’s finances in 2021.

An important measure of a municipality’s economic health is its unrestricted fund balance as a percentage of its revenue.

“In your general fund, it’s important to have a sufficient fund balance for contingencies.

needs, says Shult.

The Government Finance Officers Association recommends 16.7%, enough to run the municipality for two months without any new revenue.

Baker Tily likes to see a municipality have enough funds to operate for up to five months.

New Richmond had $2,618,638 in unrestricted funds or 46% on hand in 2021.

“It’s, by all accounts, a healthy number…it’s in the range that we’d like to see,” Shult said.

Overall, Shult called the city’s finances sound.

“To sum up, I think from all the metrics we’re highlighting, they all looked very strong. Your fund balance, even though it’s down, is more liquid than it’s been recently. … Your debt metrics are exactly where we like to see them as well as the percentage of your fund balance to your income,” Shult said.

Mail-in ballots for the November elections can be requested by going to MyVote.wi.gov

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Sharing ideas to shape the future of community engagement https://hotbagsaleuk.com/sharing-ideas-to-shape-the-future-of-community-engagement/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 23:00:38 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/sharing-ideas-to-shape-the-future-of-community-engagement/ The City of Newcastle (CN) will bring together 100 people from all walks of life to help determine how the voice of the community can be better heard to guide the future of the city. “Your Newcastle, Your Voice” is a public workshop taking place at the Wallsend Library on October 15 as part of […]]]>

The City of Newcastle (CN) will bring together 100 people from all walks of life to help determine how the voice of the community can be better heard to guide the future of the city.

“Your Newcastle, Your Voice” is a public workshop taking place at the Wallsend Library on October 15 as part of an initiative to inform CN’s new four-year community engagement strategy.

Newcastle Mayor Nuatali Nelmes said CN’s approach to engagement was based on inclusivity, transparency and responsiveness and the new strategy would build on this to ensure all Novocastrians feel part of the Board’s decision-making process.

“By involving the community in the development of our community engagement strategy, CN will better understand how the community wants to engage, but also if there are any barriers to participation in providing feedback that will help us adapt our approach,” said Cr Nelmes.

“We are committed to meaningful consultation beyond any legal requirements, as we recognize the immense value of early community engagement to achieve better planning results.”

Earlier this year, CN released its community strategic plan, Newcastle 2040, which was developed based on feedback from 4,500 people from a broad representation of the community who shared their aspirations and priorities for the future. from Newcastle.

“Whether it’s developing key strategies like Newcastle 2040 or major projects like the Newcastle Ocean Baths upgrade, we achieve better results with the community actively engaging in decision-making,” said Credit Nelmes.

“We want everyone in our community to have the opportunity to shape the future of this city and through the ‘Your Newcastle, Your Voice’ workshop, we will hear directly from the community on the best ways to do this. ”

Using a series of case studies from past projects, the ‘Your Newcastle, Your Voice’ workshop will solicit feedback from community participants on what has worked and where CN can improve engagement with the community.

The ‘Your Newcastle, Your Voice’ community workshop will be held on Saturday 15 October from 10am to 1pm at the Wallsend Library. The community can express their interest in participating in the workshop via the City of Newcastle website.

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ACEDC at a crossroads: The Agency is about to complete its strategic plan | The Sentinel: News https://hotbagsaleuk.com/acedc-at-a-crossroads-the-agency-is-about-to-complete-its-strategic-plan-the-sentinel-news/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/acedc-at-a-crossroads-the-agency-is-about-to-complete-its-strategic-plan-the-sentinel-news/ The Cumberland Area Economic Development Corp. is about to finalize the drafting of a strategic plan aimed at identifying the objectives of the agency for the next one to two years. Once completed, the plan will serve as a blueprint to guide the search for a new chief executive, acting executive administrator Gary Scicchitano said […]]]>

The Cumberland Area Economic Development Corp. is about to finalize the drafting of a strategic plan aimed at identifying the objectives of the agency for the next one to two years.

Once completed, the plan will serve as a blueprint to guide the search for a new chief executive, acting executive administrator Gary Scicchitano said in a recent interview.

“I was asked to stay until the process was completed,” he said. “At the heart of the strategic planning effort were the four pillars: economic development, workforce development, innovation/small business, and tourism.

A committee of experts has been formed around each pillar to convene meetings to compile information on economic trends and gather feedback from local businesses and staff from development corporations, Scicchitano said.

Each pillar had a different accent. Economic development focused on ways to attract, retain and expand business. Workforce development addressed methods for identifying employer needs and strategies for developing a skilled workforce.

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Innovation/Small Business explored ways to support entrepreneurs and small businesses by improving access to capital while reducing barriers to growth. Tourism has focused on attracting visitors, developing products, and promoting the livability of Cumberland County.

Now that the meetings are over, Monica Gould of Strategic Consulting Partners will distill the feedback received at the meetings into a strategic plan that could be submitted to CAEDC employees for follow-up review, Scicchitano said. The plan could then be modified and presented to the board of directors by the end of September, he said.

“We want the one- to two-year goals to be solid,” he said. “We look at how COVID has affected businesses, the economy [and] Workforce. At some point in the future, we will enter stretch goals.


ACEDC at a crossroads: The dual mission structure has helped ACEDC cope with the pandemic

Once the plan is approved, the focus will be on hiring a new Executive Director for ACEDC. In the meantime, the search for a Workforce Development Manager has already begun.

The CAEDC developed a job description and advertised the job opening, Scicchitano said. “We are preparing to start the interviews. We are looking to hire someone by the end of the year.

Once hired, the Director of Workforce Development will meet regularly with employers, educational institutions, economic development agencies and the Workforce Development Board, said Janet Anderson, Director of the economic development of the ACEDC. “It’s about awareness and getting out there. It’s about understanding the needs of employers here in Cumberland County, finding solutions to meet those needs, and partnering to provide solutions.

“Even before COVID, we weren’t able to fill many positions,” she said. “The exacerbation of COVID has been significant. You have the big resignation where individuals, 50+, are looking at early retirement. You have a younger demographic that has different expectations for the work they are doing. Many of them are interested in gig work.We work to make sure our employers have the workforce they need right here in Cumberland County, so we thought it was important to hire someone to focus on those needs.


CAEDC at a crossroads: Local hotels have mostly rebounded post-COVID

County Commissioner Vince DiFilippo sits on the CAEDC Board of Directors which meets monthly. “There are a lot of talented people involved in CAEDC,” he said. “Once the strategic plan is finalized and accepted, I think they will really take off. We’ve had a few leadership changes at the top that have impacted the organization, but it’s going in the right direction now. The interim CEO is doing a great job for us.

Joseph Cress is a reporter for The Sentinel covering education and history. You can reach him at jcress@cumberlink.com or by calling 717-218-0022.

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CUSD School Board Candidates Forum 2022 | Coronado City News https://hotbagsaleuk.com/cusd-school-board-candidates-forum-2022-coronado-city-news/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/cusd-school-board-candidates-forum-2022-coronado-city-news/ Coronado School Board Candidate Question #1 This week is your introductory piece… your “elevator pitch” if you will… “Why did you decide to run for the Coronado School Board, and what do you offer that sets you apart from other candidates ?” As an educator, mother, grandmother, friend, neighbor, and current CUSD holder, I am […]]]>

Coronado School Board Candidate Question #1

This week is your introductory piece… your “elevator pitch” if you will… “Why did you decide to run for the Coronado School Board, and what do you offer that sets you apart from other candidates ?”

As an educator, mother, grandmother, friend, neighbor, and current CUSD holder, I am running for re-election because I am invested in continuing the legacy of academic excellence at CUSD and in continuing to support all students to ensure they are prepared for the future of their choice. As a retired teacher with over 30 years of classroom experience in public schools and undergraduate and graduate universities, I understand the importance of rigorous academic standards and have experience in writing, implementing and evaluating academic standards through the use of appropriate research. education-based teaching strategies and summative and formative assessments.

I started my career in education as a high school English teacher and clinical reading specialist. Following a 25-year teaching career in public schools, I completed my doctorate in education at the University of Southern California and was invited to join the graduate faculty of the University. ‘USC where I designed and taught graduate courses in USC’s PhD and MSc programs. As part of my academic service, I worked on two Blue Ribbon panels for the California Department of Education, Commission on Teacher Credentialing: (1) The Language Arts Advisory Panel where I was one of the authors who reviewed and aligned the K – 12 Language Arts Content Standards with Professional Education Standards and (2) the Language Arts Program Review Board which reviewed language arts programs at public and private universities for accreditation. I also worked as a professional educational consultant for the National Assessment System in Sacramento, California, where I was responsible for analyzing test items to ensure that each item of the exam test California Subject Matter for Teachers (CSET) was aligned with the California Board of Education K.-12 Academic Content Standards for Language Arts. In addition, I have numerous publications and presentations at prestigious national, national and international conferences on education. My priority is to use my extensive educational experience to ensure that CUSD students have the tools, strategies, and research-based teaching programs needed to continue closing the achievement gap that has arisen. after COVID.

My decades of service as a parent volunteer have provided the foundation for my appreciation of the important role parents play in the educational success of their children. Over a period of 30 years, I have been actively involved in a variety of district and school specific committees. These activities include offering a pro bono professional development seminar on the delivery of ELA education, serving on the CSF Board of Directors (until elected to the CUSD Board of Directors), service on the CUSD Strategic Planning Committee, COSA Arts Strategic Planning Committee, Principal’s Advisory Committee; service as housewife, and numerous PTO committees. Over the past 4 years as an administrator, I have received and appreciated the important feedback shared with me by many community stakeholders. I am particularly aware of and appreciate parental input and feedback, as parents want the best for their children in our care.

My ties to the community and schools of Coronado run deep. My dad worked at NAS when I was a kid. I moved to Coronado in 1987 with my family because of the excellent school system. My daughter attended Village Elementary, CMS, and CHS (Class of 1999), so I bring both a parent perspective and a professional educator perspective to our school district. Additionally, my ties to CUSD continue with my granddaughter who is currently in grade 6 at CMS.

My community service and professional affiliations include Rotary, Coronado Schools Foundation Board, PEO (a charitable educational association that provides college scholarships to women who would otherwise not have access to higher education), Phi Delta Kappa USC Chapter ( which focuses on growing, mentoring, and connecting education leaders) and the USC Alumni Association.

My candidacy is endorsed by civic leaders, business professionals, educators, and many of my friends and neighbors in Coronado. I ask that your vote be re-elected to the CUSD Board of Trustees so that I can continue to serve our community with a focus on student success and scholars, in a safe and secure environment, to ensure that students realize their full potential and are prepared for the future of their choosing.

FLIGHT. 112, NO. September 37 – 14, 2022

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Marana OKs 5th Strategic Plan | Marana News https://hotbagsaleuk.com/marana-oks-5th-strategic-plan-marana-news/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/marana-oks-5th-strategic-plan-marana-news/ Marana City Council has unanimously approved its fifth strategic plan, giving the city a roadmap for the near future. The board voted on the plan at its regular Sept. 6 meeting. It was the culmination of months of meetings and feedback over the past seven months. It offers many new actions. “I think it’s a […]]]>

Marana City Council has unanimously approved its fifth strategic plan, giving the city a roadmap for the near future.

The board voted on the plan at its regular Sept. 6 meeting. It was the culmination of months of meetings and feedback over the past seven months. It offers many new actions.

“I think it’s a great plan with a new format,” Mayor Ed Honea said. “Andrea Caicedo (assistant city manager) stomped on it and set up the format. … It’s a matter of history, it’s a matter of business, it’s a matter of leisure.

“A person can go through this format quite easily. It’s kind of directional to let people know what we’re thinking and what we’re doing. … We have updated as needed. It was a great upgrade. We still stayed on the same five topics, but the layout was so much better.

The plan’s five main themes are: Cherished Heritage, Vibrant Community, Thriving Commerce, Healthy Lifestyles and Proactive Public Services.

“I was very pleased with the process and the end result that makes Marana special and keeps it that way,” said board member Jackie Craig. “I think our mission and our strategic goals really say what’s important in this city.”

A new aspect of this strategic plan is the addition of software that will allow elected municipal officials and the public to know the progress of new projects. It’s by the company Envision and is used for strategic planning and performance management, among other things, Caicedo said.

The city hopes to have the software operational by the first quarter of 2023, Caicedo said. “This will provide a public dashboard (on the city’s website).”

“This new program will show how we are progressing…” Honea said. “You’ll be like, ‘Hey, you’re doing a rig for a park or they’re going to fund it with this. Now you will be aware of progress long before you see any movement on the site.

“There are a lot of new things (in the plan), but it doesn’t highlight everything the city is doing,” Caicedo said, “because there’s a lot going on in the community.”

So what can the people of Marana expect from the plan? Here is an abbreviated list of proposals in each of the five categories of interest:

Cherished heritage

  • A Marana Culture and Heritage Preservation Plan will be developed to provide a comprehensive record of historical and cultural resources.

  • Educational programs and initiatives will increase community awareness of the city’s rich heritage.

  • Historical heritage will be integrated into policy and planning to ensure the continuity of the city’s heritage. This will include the advanced development of Marana Heritage Park and an expansion of the current arts policy to require the integration of public art into public and private development projects that capture the city’s heritage.

  • The city will also provide places where residents can celebrate and learn about Marana’s history and traditions. To this end, the city will leverage public developments and facilities, events and amenities to incorporate artistic features and cultural expression related to heritage. Additionally, the city will identify heritage sites for a heritage museum.

Vibrant community

  • Establish a strong sense of place through the creation of unique public spaces and architecture that promote community pride. Build a Marana-scale lifestyle brand; improve architectural sites and landscaping standards: work with the Marana Unified School District, MHC Healthcare, Northwest Fire District and others to identify and develop venues for arts, music and cultural talent premises in public spaces and facilities.

  • Provide high-level public safety services that enhance Marana’s reputation as a safe and secure city: prepare an annual report that tracks the department’s performance against industry standards and recommends strategies to improve the police department of Marana; support a safe and informed community through educational programs, events and public safety investigations.

  • Provide a safe and connected multi-model transportation system to meet the mobility needs of current and future residents: update the Transportation Master Plan to support a comprehensive approach to street design; improve the safety of people using all modes of transportation by implementing programs, policies, educational resources and infrastructural improvements to minimize traffic congestion.

  • Support initiatives that improve the quality of Marana’s neighborhoods: provide programs for animal welfare, community beautification, safe disposal and recycling of hazardous waste; conduct a community needs assessment and revitalization plan that prioritizes areas in need; accept the US Department of Housing and Urban Development’s invitation to become a metropolitan city and run our own community block program; encourage housing options by analyzing currently available housing and identifying incentives and codes to further diversify the housing stock and improve affordability.

  • Invite citizens to get involved and ensure transparent and timely dissemination of information through a variety of traditional and innovative platforms.

Booming trade

  • Provide an enabling environment for industry leaders, startups, small businesses and entrepreneurs at every stage of business development: Assess and implement business development tools and strategies to support retention and expanding Marana’s major employers and attracting new compatible sectors; Develop a conceptual vision, design standards and implementation strategy for downtown Marana.

  • Develop Marana’s thriving tourism industry by promoting its heritage, cultural resources, scenic open spaces and signature events.

  • Maximize the economic impact of the airport by identifying and recruiting aviation and non-aviation industries for business development opportunities: updating the airport master plan; develop a marketing plan for the airport.

  • Collaborate with educational institutions to provide educational opportunities to meet current and future workforce and community needs: commission a feasibility study, plan and strategy to attract educational institutions post-secondary education and training.

A healthy lifestyle

  • Provide a wide variety of recreational programs and amenities for residents of all ages and abilities: continue to improve recreational programs throughout the year; develop and improve sports for young people; maintaining clean, safe and accessible recreational facilities; invest in key priorities of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan; improve the network of trails and shared-use trails that provide non-vehicular modes of travel, including cycling and walking.

  • Identify open spaces and balance them with community needs: develop landscaping and irrigation design guidelines for ongoing improvements; develop and adopt an open space and wildlife conservation master plan.

Proactive public services

  • Prioritize infrastructure and maintenance that supports new growth and development in a proactive and sustainable manner: update the five-year capital improvement plan; asset development and management program; develop best practices to encourage energy conservation and sustainability; assess current development practices; establish standard principles and practices for the design of drainage facilities; study the short and long term benefits and financial impacts of annexation.

  • Maintain and secure water supply and provide high quality water and reclamation infrastructure to meet current and future customer needs: provide safe, reliable and sustainable water service; encourage water conservation; investing in new and renewable water resources and conservation efforts; invest in water supply and water harvesting infrastructure.

  • Improve the quality of the city’s public service through efficient procedures: update of the equipment master plan; provide accurate and responsive administration of municipal archives; maintain a transparent financial environment.

  • Foster a corporate culture that attracts, retains and motivates a talented workforce.

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Santa Barbara City College enrollment still below pre-pandemic numbers | School zone https://hotbagsaleuk.com/santa-barbara-city-college-enrollment-still-below-pre-pandemic-numbers-school-zone/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 04:53:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/santa-barbara-city-college-enrollment-still-below-pre-pandemic-numbers-school-zone/ Whereas Santa Barbara City College enrollment is even lower than usual, with more students returning to campus for in-person classes this year. The college has about 12,000 credit students and 2,500 non-credit students this fall, according to Martha Swanson, SBCC’s executive director of public affairs and communications. “While the pandemic may have compelled us to […]]]>

Whereas Santa Barbara City College enrollment is even lower than usual, with more students returning to campus for in-person classes this year.

The college has about 12,000 credit students and 2,500 non-credit students this fall, according to Martha Swanson, SBCC’s executive director of public affairs and communications.

“While the pandemic may have compelled us to create more online offerings, we’re also seeing that CCSC students appreciate the flexibility they provide,” Swanson said. “That being said, we also know that many students prefer in-person meetings and do better when they are in person.”

Swanson said about 4,000 more students were taking in-person classes this fall compared to last year.

“It feels like the campus has really come alive,” Swanson said. “There’s a palpable excitement about really being back on campus this fall.”

While there are fewer students taking classes for college credit, Swanson said, the drop isn’t as significant as in recent years.

A number of students served in fall 2021 shows that there were 13,781 credited students. Swanson said as of Friday the decline from last year to this fall is 2.8%.

There was a 9.2% decrease in student enrollment between fall 2019 and 2020, she said, and a 5.1% decrease between fall 2020 and 2021.

As for students enrolled before the pandemic, Swanson said the college is working to help them return to Santa Barbara City College.

“We are proactively reaching out to students who were enrolled before the pandemic and trying to make it as easy as possible for them to return,” Swanson said. “For example, we’ve held re-enrollment days and offered up to $500 in book grants to help cover the cost of textbooks and supplies.”

Santa Barbara City College still requires students and staff to wear masks, while the county is in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention COVID-19 Community Medium or High Levels.

Santa Barbara County is in the lower tier, but the college has a two-week transition period, which means masks will become optional on Sept. 16 as long as the county remains in the lower tier.

The college will still strongly recommend masks indoors, even when county is low.

SBCC is also working this year on develop a new 5-year strategic plan.

“The development of a new strategic plan comes at a crucial time for the college, as schools across the country have seen significant changes in how students access higher education and the conditions created by the pandemic. revealed a variety of student needs inside and outside the classroom,” the college explains on its strategic planning webpage.

– Noozhawk editor Serena Guentz can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Login with Noozhawk on Facebook.

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Focus on results and have fun along the way | Local company https://hotbagsaleuk.com/focus-on-results-and-have-fun-along-the-way-local-company/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 13:45:00 +0000 https://hotbagsaleuk.com/focus-on-results-and-have-fun-along-the-way-local-company/ Can you imagine watching a football game where the teams have no game plan or goal posts? It would be like watching gorillas run through the mud until they drop from exhaustion. Can you imagine running a business, nonprofit, or university department without a strategic plan or measurable goals? It would be like watching monkeys […]]]>

Can you imagine watching a football game where the teams have no game plan or goal posts? It would be like watching gorillas run through the mud until they drop from exhaustion. Can you imagine running a business, nonprofit, or university department without a strategic plan or measurable goals? It would be like watching monkeys looking for bananas in the wrong places. I suspect everyone reading this today understands the importance of being results-oriented, but based on barbecue conversations all over Fairbanks, some managers may not have their eye on the ball.

At Labor Day barbecues, the conversations invariably turned to work. Being the egoist that I am, I’ve bragged that our department’s faculty and staff have been focused all year on results and are now ending the year hitting our projected numbers. During last fall’s strategic planning process, we also focused on the human side, making sure to keep the office fun, surprising and entertaining. Business schools teach TQM, Maslow, and other theories of motivation, but most don’t teach the power over productivity of an appropriate measure of “pleasure.” It’s as important for a supervisor to keep the office environment fresh and vibrant (assuming one wants to keep good employees) as it is to keep the spark in a marriage (again assuming one wants stay married). It takes planning and work, but the results (remember – always focus on the results) are worth it.

Charlie Dexter is Emeritus Professor of Applied Business at UAF Community and Technical College. He can be contacted at cndexter@alaska.edu. This column is brought to you as a public service by the UAF Applied Affairs Department.

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